Our history

Lutheran Schools 1839 - Present

(ALIVE175! LEA Presentation

 

Lutherans were the first Protestants and trace their origins back to the Reformation of western Christendom in the sixteenth century.  With some seventy million members, the Lutheran church is still the largest Protestant denomination in the world.  As a church with an emphasis on biblical literacy and Christian education it has supported the provision of Christian schools from its beginnings.

 

The long tradition of Lutheran schooling has been part of this country's history too.  Lutherans have operated schools in Australia since 1839.  Currently there are Lutheran schools located in every state and territory of Australia except the ACT.  The church operates early childhood centres as well.  The Lutheran church also has its own tertiary institution, Australian Lutheran College, which provides special training for Lutheran teachers in order to promote a distinctive ethos in its schools.

 

Lutheran Education Australia commissioned the writing of a history of Lutheran schooling in Australia.   Richard Hauser, now retired Lutheran principal and educator, undertook the challenge.  Two histories have been written each spanning 80 years of history through the examination of Lutheran leaders and educators whose work has influenced the development of Lutheran schooling in Australia.

The Patriarchs: A history of Lutheran schooling 1839-1919

 

This book considers the contribution to the Lutheran church and its schools by August Kavel, Daniel Fritzsche, Wilhelm Boehm, Rudolph Ey, Theodor Langebecker, Carl Krichauff, Wilhelm Peters and George Leidig

 

 

The Pathfinders: A history of Lutheran schooling 1919-1999

 

This book considers the contribution to the Lutheran church and its schools by Henry Harmann, Karl Muetzelfeldt, Garry Matuschka, Gertrude Jacob, Elvin Janetzki, Carson Dron, John Zweck, Thomas Reuther

 

 

 

Through The Patriarchs and The Pathfinders Richard Hauser captures the human qualities and struggles of the people featured and provides the reader with a deep appreciation of the contributions such a diverse range of Lutheran people have made.

 

The books are available for purchase online

1930 the year of the Golden Jubilee 1980: the by gone days

1930 the year of the Golden Jubilee 1980: the by gone days by Doris Sickerdick

Doris Sickerdick, a student at Lobethal Lutheran School after it re-opened in 1930 wrote this recollection of school days for the school’s Golden Jubilee in 1980.

LUTHER the movie

Released in 2005, LUTHER the movie has special significance for Lutheran schools. Martin Luther valued education and was vehement in advocating for the education of both boys and girls. Since the time of Luther the churches that have borne his name have also always valued education. Whether it was Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, Germany, South Africa, Brazil, Zimbabwe, USA or Australia, wherever Lutherans went they established schools. Thus in Australia the first Lutheran school was established in Adelaide on the banks of the River Torrens in 1839.  LUTHER the movie is a wonderful opportunity to reflect again on our heritage and why we operate Lutheran schools.  Read more in the study resources